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Using Heart rate variability (HRV) for BP management



Introduction

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is a measure of the variation in time between consecutive heartbeats. It is an important indicator of heart health and has been used to monitor and improve the health of blood pressure patients. In this blog, we will discuss how HRV can be used to track and improve heart health, especially for blood pressure patients. For more info on HRV, refer here.


What is HRV?

HRV is the measure of the variation in time between consecutive heartbeats. It is a complex interplay between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system that regulates heart rate. HRV can be measured using electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate monitors, and other wearable devices or by using a suitable mobile app like the MIndbreath app.




Why is HRV important for heart health?

HRV is important because it reflects the adaptability and flexibility of the cardiovascular system. A higher HRV indicates a healthy heart that is capable of responding to various physiological demands. A lower HRV, on the other hand, indicates an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other health problems.



High HRV:-


- High immunity and resilience


- Multitasking easily


- Feeling of well-being


- Less fatigue


- Happier mental state


HRV and Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a common health problem that affects millions of people worldwide. It is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and other health problems. HRV can be used to monitor and improve heart health, especially for blood pressure patients.


A higher HRV generally indicates a healthier and more resilient cardiovascular system. A high HRV indicates that the autonomic nervous system is functioning optimally.



HRV monitoring and blood pressure patients

HRV monitoring can help identify changes in the body's stress and relaxation response in hypertension patients. This information can be used to adjust treatment plans and improve heart health. For example, if a hypertension patient has a low HRV, their treatment plan may be adjusted to include more relaxation techniques and stress management strategies, such as deep breathing exercises, meditation, or yoga.


HRV Biofeedback

HRV biofeedback is a technique that involves using HRV monitoring to help individuals improve their heart health. The goal of HRV biofeedback is to increase HRV by teaching individuals relaxation techniques and stress management strategies. Our research shows an average increase in HRV by 28% with deep harmonious breathing.







Research evidence of breathing techniques for BP reduction

Studies have shown that breathing techniques such as yoga, slow and regularized breathing, and rhythmic breathing can reduce blood pressure in hypertensive patients. For example, a study published in the Journal of Human Hypertension found that a device that slows and regularizes breathing reduced blood pressure in hypertensive patients by an average of 10/6 mmHg. Explore simple yogic breathing that can be done anytime anywhere with the Mindbreath app.


We would recommend to take a reading, do a breath session with the app and compare the BP readings and see the difference for yourself. Thousands of users have seen an immediate difference.





Conclusion

HRV is an important indicator of heart health that can be used to monitor and improve the health of blood pressure patients. HRV monitoring can help identify changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity, which can be used to adjust treatment plans and improve heart health. HRV breathing biofeedback is a technique that can be used to increase HRV levels by teaching individuals relaxation techniques and stress management strategies. Breathing techniques such as yoga and slow and regularized breathing have also been shown to reduce blood pressure in hypertensive patients.


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References:

Authors: N. Pagonas, P. Schmidt, E. Dechend, et al. Title: Telmisartan improves vascular function in patients with hypertension Journal: Journal of Human Hypertension



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